Have an Idea for Tridion Sites 9.1?

My fellow Product Owners for SDL Tridion Sites have an interesting challenge to somehow understand and clarify the top community product ideas to size them for prioritization against everything else that will be in the Tridion Sites 9.1 release (scheduled for after Sites 9, if the version wasn’t clear).

My colleague Rick has been leading this effort and I’m doing my part to point out all the (many) channels we have in the community and ways to solicit feedback. Ironically, it’s hard to get feedback that we can use to actually understand and size a few of these ideas, especially after I’ve noticed everyone seems to have an idea.
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Excel — an excellent editor for Tridion component lists

TridionExcelTridionOne of our customers has a pattern where they have a list of component links in a container component. Some of these container components are hundreds of links long.

Although the contained components are ported from DEV to UAT to PROD, adding the components to the containers is done manually. This usually works well, but what happens when some links are missing? How do you sort through hundreds of component links to find if you need to add one?

In this post I show how to use Excel and Notepad++ to work with the contents of the container component.

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Finding the startup parameters used by your Windows Service

When you install one of the Tridion micro-services as a Windows service, you can specify a number of startup parameters. These may include settings such as the database host, database login, the port to use, etc.

These settings will be remembered and used every time the Windows service starts.

But what if you want to see which settings were used, later on?
For that, you will have to look in the Windows registry. The following location is an example using the Discovery service:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Apache Software Foundation\Procrun 2.0\SDLWebDiscoveryService\Parameters

You’ll notice a number of sub-keys: Java, Log, Start, and Stop. The most interesting information is in the Java and Start keys.

The Java key contains the classpath to use (yes, set at the time of installation), the JVM options, and most of the parameters specified for the service (in the Options value).

Java key

Registry key containing most of the startup options

The Start key contains the working directory and the parameters directly related to the hosting of the service (e.g. port to use and whether or not it should register its capabilities with the Discovery service automatically).

Start key

Registry key containing the hosting options

 

If you just need to tweak one of the values, you can edit these registry keys and restart the service. If you require a large amount of changes, I recommend simply uninstalling the service and re-installing it with the new parameters.

Event System and Publishing – a look at performance tests

tortoise-and-the-hareOne of our clients uses Tridion 2013 SP1, and has strict audit requirements for their publishing. We need to know what is on the site at any particular point in time. The auditors might ask, for example, what the user saw if they viewed the site two weeks ago last Tuesday at 3am.

We have to track what gets published, and make sure that we have no significant performance degradation while we’re doing that. Publishing for our releases already take several hours, and we can’t extend that by any significant amount of time.

These tests let us look at different options for this timing. Once the tests have been run, we will then have a better idea of which one to implement.

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Trick to Submitting a POST Request with Java DXA 1.7

We had a scenario while building a form on Java DXA 1.7 and tried to have it submit via POST, not GET. We had the form working perfectly via GET, but when we changed the method to POST the response was a 403 Forbidden. We poked in many directions, such as directory security settings and web.xml configs. In the end it was the CSRF configuration built into DXA that was the answer…

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TDS 2017 : Was it different than last year?

YES!

Why was it different this year (TDS2017)? And why should I go next year?

This year, as ever, was a festival of information packed presentations with lots of opportunities to network with developers and some customers too. Not only that – Content Bloom were the Diamond Sponsors so it was great to have a strong contingent from our various offices across the globe (including Nova Scotia, New Orleans, Belgium, UK, India, Czech Republic, Ukraine).

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